The Townsend Letter

Dr. Wallach's views on health, nutrition, and on the state of medical care in this country are unconventional, unorthodox and typically "anti-establishment." In the last six months or so, as his audio tape, Dead Doctors Don't Lie, has gained in popularity we have seen many attempts, in the press and on the internet to discredit Dr. Wallach and to poke holes in his arguments. In the July 1997 edition of the Townsend Letter for Doctors & Patients Dr. Morton Walker, a respected medical journalist, does an excellent job of both listing critical opinion and setting the record straight by sounding Dr. Wallach's response. We reprint Dr. Walker's article, Medical Journalist Report of Innovative Biologics here, in full, with permission of the author:

A Reporter's Response To The Internet Critique Of Joel Wallach, Dvm, Nd, And His Audiocassette, 'Dead Doctors Don't Lie.'

On pages 126 to 128 of "BookCorners," the book review section of the Townsend Letter for Doctors & Patients, (#163/164, February/March 1997), an article appeared criticizing the flamboyant, wholistic medical mover and shaker, Joel Wallach, DVM, ND, of San Diego, California. The outright criticism, as published, came from an anonymous source who commented on Dr. Wallach's audiocassette tape, "Dead Doctors Don't Lie." Using this cassette tape as a promotional tool, Dr. Wallach offers the public innovative biologic food supplements in the form of colloidal minerals. The audiotape has been broadly distributed by mail and through the internet to the worldwide web.

Unlike other reviews appearing in "BookCorners," this internet "Scientific Critique" was presented to TlfDP readers by an unsigned source - no identity. Did its commentary come from publisher Jonathan Collin, MD, editor Irene Alleger, editorial assistant Jule Klotter, or another usual book reviewer for the TlfDP? The reader is left to ponder.

Such pondering led to my investigations. I was looking for confirmation of the internet critic's "debunking" of statements made by Dr. Wallach on his audiotape. Where might I find such confirmation? The internet critic remains anonymous and the magazine's reviewer is anonymous, too. I decided to be brazen and inquire of the tape producer himself. Besides, although he deserves a chance to reply, Dr. Wallach had not previously been given equal space by TlfDP. Strictly as a reporter on topics of innovative biologics and occasional medical politics, therefore, I pursued the veterinarian turned naturopath to get his response to the unidentified critiquer who often branded Dead Doctors Don't Lie as "absurd and insupportable." I also solicited Dr. Wallach's rebuttal, if any, to implied criticisms from the unknown reviewer.

The following comments are taken from tape recorded interviews I conducted in person and during telephone conversations with Dr. Joel D. Wallach.

A 1991 Nominee for the Nobel Prize in Medicine

(1)The internet critic is unimpressed that Dr. Wallach was a 1991 Nobel Prize nominee for medicine and says "anyone can nominate anyone." I know that the critic is wrong about the simplicity of this nominating procedure, because I went through it twice in different years for worthy nominees.

To nominate someone for the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine, one must first present personal credentials sufficient to warrant receiving an application from the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. When and if the application arrives, the credentialed nominator must fill in the application with accomplishments of the nominee and submit it to the appropriate office at the Karolinska Institute.

Such a Nobel Prize nomination for Dr. Wallach is, in fact, quite true, and I hold a copy of the nominating letter from the 3,000 membership, Atlanta-based Association of Eclectic Physicians (chartered in 1823), dated September 7, 1990. It's signed by Daniel G. Clark, MD and William H. Moore, Jr., Esq. With three others, Dr. Wallach was to be considered because of his "elucidating the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis as a selenium deficiency."

Performance of Animal and Human Autopsies

(2) The critic expresses doubt that Dr. Wallach performed 3,000 autopsies on humans. He did perform 17,500 autopsies on 454 species of animals and, because of his experience, he was frequently asked to render professional opinions on human autopsy material. Starting in 1962 Dr. Wallach performed "re-do" human autopsies on "autopsy sets" supplied by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). These "sets" consist of an average of 400 pathology slides of human tissue along with the patients' health histories. It's standard procedure for pathologists to study this way and, upon completing a "set," the pathologist is credited with having performed an autopsy. As a graduate student working toward his PhD, Dr. Wallach taught pathology at Iowa State University as well.

From 1966 to 1968, Dr. Wallach was a postdoctoral fellow with he Center for the Biology of Natural Systems, Washington University at St. Louis, Missouri. There he continued to do animal and human autopsies under the supervision of board certified pathologists.

People Suffer from Pica

(3) The critic looks askance at Dr. Wallach's description of pica being a form of cribbing. Pica is the indiscriminate eating by humans of non-nutritious substances with current evidence showing it's a manifestation of particular mineral deficiencies. The variety of animal pica is referred to as cribbing, and includes the eating of harmful substances such as stones and materials forming the animals' stalls or cribs.

Dr. Wallach advises me that the snack food industry has managed to convert people with pica from eating ice, dirt and grass to eating sugared foods and salty chips - the munchies. This craving among mostly inactive people comes from their expressing mineral deficiencies. Pica is a symptom of mineral deficiencies, including iron and phosphorous.

Medical Doctors Die at Average Age 58

(4) The critic questions Dr. Wallach's statement on his tape that US medical doctors have shorter life expectancies than the average American, who dies at 75.5 years. He collects MD obituaries, including the announcements of death in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). From the small evaluation he performed on January 20 1993, Dr. Wallach concludes that AMA members are seemingly dying at an average age of 57.6 years. Dr. Wallach says, "Even if the internet critic is correct in stating that the average physician lives 70 years, that's still five and a half years less than the life expectancy of the average American citizen!"

An Anticancer Diet Exists

(5) The critic disagrees with Dr. Wallach that an anticancer diet has been found. But this announcement was headlined in September 1993 from a press release issued by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Anticancer dietary supplements, specifically selenium, were pinpointed on December 25, 1996 by researchers at the University of Arizona, who published their findings in JAMA.

The Incidence of Alzheimer's Disease

(6) In disagreeing with Dr. Wallach's statistic of Alzheimer's disease being as high as 50% among people over age seventy, the internet critic states that the incidence of Alzheimer's disease actually is 3.9%. The critic is dead wrong again!

I coauthored a book showing causes and treatments for dementia of the Alzheimer's type (DAT), Toxic Metal Syndrome: How Metal Poisonings Can Affect Your Brain, with H. Richard Casdorph, MD, PhD, of Long Beach, California, and our statistics differ sharply from he critic's numbers. In contrast, Dr. Wallach comes close to being correct. In the book, I wrote: "...Alzheimer's disease affects up to 10% of persons over sixty-five, 25% of those over eighty, and nearly 50% over eighty-five...It is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States with an upward trend producing approximately 350,000 newly diagnosed cases of Alzheimer's disease annually."1

Pigs Manifest Alzheimer's Disease

(7) In disputing Dr. Wallach's knowledge and statements as a veterinarian, the critic says that "pigs don't get Alzheimer's disease." Dr. Wallach points out the at the critic is using incorrect terminology in referring t the animals' disability. In pigs, chickens, and other animals, Alzheimer's disease is called encephalomalacia, a brain syndrome that matches the human form of such dementia. As with elderly humans, a type of DAT does affect pigs.

Butter is Better than Olive Oil

(8) This critic commenting over the internet prefers olive oil to butter as an eating and cooking fat, but Dr. Wallach likes butter better. He took his information from the eating habits of long-lived societies who use butter and yak fat, and those third world cultures often live to be 120 years old or beyond.

Copper Deficiency Causes Gray Hair and Wrinkles

(9) The critic comments adversely on Dr. Wallach's belief that copper deficiency is the source of gray hair and facial wrinkles and labels the statement as "absurd and insupportable." Dr. Wallach has the research showing that the enzyme lyseal oxidase requires copper as a cofactor to change proelastin into elastin. If one is copper deficient, the process of making elastin stops so that wrinkles, sagging tissues, varicose veins and other skin difficulties develop.

As to copper's connection to gray hair, the mineral is required to form melanin which pigments hair. If you lack copper, pigment will be sparse or absent. In animal husbandry, if a sheep farmer wants his black animals to grow white wool, he gives them a copper deficiency. Turkey farmers are able to raise birds with the same colorings as zebras - stripes or bars of black and white or brown and white. As the turkeys' feathers grow and molt, the farmers alternate feedings to produce copper deficiency and then copper sufficiency...copper deficiency...copper sufficiency...copper deficiency...copper sufficiency, as the feathers go through their growth cycles. A bar-like effect is the result.

Cardiomyopathy Comes from a Selenium Deficiency

(10) The anonymous critic totally disagrees with Dr. Wallach who states that cardiomyopathy derives from a selenium deficiency. In 1957, veterinarians learned that cardiomyopathy and muscular dystrophy in animals were caused by selenium deficiency. Cardiomyopathy in animals is called mulberry heart disease and muscular dystrophy is known as white muscle disease. As a veterinarian, Dr. Wallach's training gives him certain advantages over doctors who treat humans only, for he reads the literature of both groups.

During the 1980's, Dr. Wallach conducted extensive study in China on a fatal form of cardiomyopathy in humans known as Keshan disease (KD). In this study, Dr. Wallach analyzed autopsy material from 1700 cases of DD at Harbin Medical University, Shanghai Medical University and Beijing Medical University. The results of this study have been published in two Chinese medical journals. There was no selenium in the crop soils of Keshan China, so 13 out of every 1,000 children died of cardiomyopathy. The World Health Organization (WHO) sent in a group of scientists who determined that, indeed, selenium deficiency was causing the problem. One milligram of sodium selenite (NaSe) fed to 36,000 school children was compared to 9,000 controls who received no selenium. The result proved the lack of selenium was the cause of cardiomyopathy heart disease. There were no genetic or infectious factors involved.

The Death of Dr. Stewart Berger

(11) Then the critic played up the death of Stewart Berger, MD, of New York City as resulting from cardiomyopathy because he was obese and probably abused drugs. Dr. Wallach declares that even persons with bad habits and who supplement their diets with nutrient pills not being absorbed as had Dr. Berger, have a high probability of selenium deficiency.

Identifying the Anonymous Critic

(12) At this point during our interviews, in response to my prodding him with certain additional irritating comments coming from his highly critical challenger, Dr. Wallach identified whom he suspects as the anonymous internet critic.

Dr. Wallach stated: "I believe this anonymous internet critic actually is the paid consultant for several commercial companies that sell multivitamin and multi-mineral pills. The motivation to criticize is likely to come from this critic's desire to try and knock me off as a nutritional supplement competitor. I've heard the same erroneous commentary from the critic before."

Aneurysms Arise from a Copper Deficiency

(13) When it comes to aneurysm, the internet critic indicates that Dr. Wallach is off base when he blames aneurysm on a deficiency of copper. Although there exist 40 different listings of aneurysm types, only one root cause of them prevails, replies Dr. Wallach. It does not matter how they get classified, lack of copper starts up the entire pathological process evolving into aneurysm. "Remember, copper is required as a cofactor to convert proelastin into elastin or elastic fibers; the basic root cause of all Aneurysms is a disruption of the elastic fibers of the artery walls," says the veterinarian/naturopath. "The fundamental definitive research on aneurism and copper deficiency was performed on turkeys for farmers."

Male Pattern Baldness Comes from a Tin Deficiency

(14) The critic says that Dr. Wallach's remarks concerning tin as a cause of baldness "is entirely incorrect." Yet, work with animals was published in Kyoto, Japan in 1990 that indicates tin (Sn) deficiency stimulates the development of male pattern baldness. Rats fed tin at 17.0 ng/gm show poor growth, reduced feeding efficiency, hearing loss, and bilateral (male pattern) hair loss, while rats fed 1.99 mcg/gm were physiologically and anatomically normal. Tin, in fact, is a prevention factor for cancer. Also, a November 1991 US federal study shows that the lack of tin in the diet leads to impaired hearing for older men at any given age than in men of earlier generations.

Calcium Deficiency Causes Bell's Palsy

(15) This internet critic totally discounts Dr. Wallach's claim that Bell's palsy, a condition with neurological symptoms, comes from a calcium deficiency. When someone comes down with osteoporosis, the veterinarian/naturopath explains, bones try to get stronger by generating connective tissue so that they actually become measurably larger. The bones squeeze against the nerves. In Bell's palsy the seventh cranial nerve gets compressed by the newly grown connective tissue. To reverse Bell's palsy, therefore, it is necessary to take minerals and other nutrients that reverse osteoporosis, nutrients which may include calcium, magnesium, chondroitin sulfate, etc. The bones will then revert to their normal size and ease pressure on the seventh cranial nerve and Bell's palsy goes away.

Other neurological involvements relating to osteoporosis from calcium deficiency are tinnitus (which may be associated with vertigo and then it's called Wallach's vertigo), spinal stenosis, and tic douloreux or trigeminal neuralgia. Corticosteroids do help temporarily because they stop the inflammatory-like process affecting the connective tissues. But to get rid of these problems, calcium and chondroitin sulfate must be given to correct osteoporosis.

Vanadium/Chromium Deficiencies Upset Sugar Metabolism

(16) The internet critic puts no stock in Dr. Wallach's focus on vanadium and chromium being two essential minerals involved in sugar metabolism. The critic says that vanadium isn't even recognized as an essential nutrient for humans. Dr. Wallach replies: "Vanadium and chromium affect sugar and fat metabolism. In 1985, the Vancouver Medical School declared that vanadium alone could replace insulin for adult onset diabetics."

Arthritis is Osteoporotic Bone Ends

(17) The internet critic flatout says that it's incorrect to describe arthritis as being osteoporosis of the joint ends of the bones. Dr. Wallach is firm in his admonition about wear and tear arthritis coming from poor nutrition. Such a nutritional lack will be connected to the presence of osteoporosis. He told me, "When the bone melts away, the cartilage wears through and all this relates to calcium and other minerals being deficient..Arthritics deficient in calcium will also be lacking in other minerals such as sulfur, magnesium, and so forth."

Dr. Wallach Dismisses Good Oral Hygiene

(18) Shocked! Is the reaction of the internet critic as related to Dr. Wallach discounting good oral hygiene as a prevention of periodontal disease. In turn, the audiotape producer explains "When one gets receding gums, gingivitis, pyorrhea periodontitis, loose teeth, and other gum disease, the dental profession has the malignant belief that infection is causing the problem. That's dumb! The baseline trouble is osteoporosis of the jaw and facial bones. That's because the bones are rather thin and disappear quickly in the presence of osteoporosis. The key to treatment is to give enough calcium and other minerals. Good oral hygiene may assist against the associated secondary infection but not the osteoporosis."

The Eating Habits of Long-Lived People

(19) "One of the most simplistic and nonsensical claims made on this tape," says the internet critic, "is that people who live to be 100 years old drink 40 cups of tea every day and put rock salt and two pats of butter in each cup." Dr. Wallach backs up his statement by advising that these long lived folk reside in semi-arid locations high in the mountains. Therefore, they drink numerous two- to four-ounce cups of tea and coffee daily and do use butter and salt in their beverage. His information, he assures me, comes from the National Geographic magazine, published in January 1973.

Surgeons Make Mercedes Payments by Doing Hysterectomies

(20) The internet critic takes a pro-AMA stance when he or she unequivocally states as a defense of surgeons, "hysterectomies are being performed mostly because of ovarian cancer or other diseases."

Dr. Wallach says, "365,000 hysterectomies are done each year and the group, Physicians for Responsible Medicine declare that only 10% are of value. That group has supplied me with my figures. The same statement was published again by that group in March 1997."

Osteoporosis Brings on Most Low Back Pain

(21) The critic labels "absurd" Dr. Wallach's claim that osteoporosis is responsible for bringing on low back pain most of the time. "Calcium deficiency is behind all types of back pain because osteoporosis causes the actual symptomatology," this tape producer says in response.

Diabetes Cured with Vanadium/Chromium Supplementation

(22) The critic wants to see Dr. Wallach's patient records showing that diabetics get permanent help by the appropriate use of vanadium and chromium supplementation. "You can wean adult onset diabetics off insulin, merely by giving them the amounts of vanadium and chromium that they need, states the doctor.

Colloidal Minerals that Are Metallic and Non-Metallic

(23) The anonymous individual who has given us this so called "scientific critique" wants to see Dr. Wallach's documentation for his statement about metallic minerals and their 8 to 12% absorbability. In answer, the Dead Doctors Don't Lie lecturer says, "Plant-derived colloidal minerals don't come from soils as do elemental metallic minerals that are fossilized and taken from the ground. After age 35 the ability of a human to absorb metallic minerals drops to 3 to 5%. I took those numbers from the seventh edition of Food, Nutrition and Diet Therapy, written by Krause and Maham, published by the W.B. Saunders Company in 1984. Gerhardt Schrauzer, Dsc, Professor Emeritis at the University of California at San Diego, shows that plant-derived colloidal minerals are ten times more absorbable than soil-derived elemental minerals."

Vitamin Tablets Appear in Portable Toilets

(24) The internet critic doesn't believe that the owner of a portable toilet company sees vitamin tablets lying in his porta potties. In answer, Dr. Wallach assures me that the portable toilet company is located in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

"Also, the public works department of Salt Lake City, Utah fills two 55 gallon cans with loads of vitamin and mineral pills each year. The pills clog their sewer system's grid for the sewer processing plant. Call the city's public works department to confirm my statement," advises Dr. Wallach.

Iron Oxide (Rust) in Nutrient Formulations

(25) Being facetious, the internet critic says he's never found rust listed on the label of any nutrient formulation. Since he didn't understand the commentator's criticism, Dr. Wallach agreed that iron oxide found on labels for bottles of multi minerals is rust and otherwise offered no other reply to the implied criticism.

The Wallach Calcium Lactate Story

(26) The critic disdains Dr. Wallach's claim that only 10% of calcium is a 1000-mg tablet of calcium lactate containing 250mg of calcium is absorbed. Dr. Wallach does, indeed correct himself and advises that calcium lactate holds just 140 mg of calcium with only 14mg absorbed. The tablet's balance is 860mg of milk sugar which has little nutritional value.

98 Percent of Colloidal Minerals are Absorbed

(27) The critic is dubious of the audiotape's statement relating to 98% colloidal mineral absorption because Dr. Wallach sells colloidal minerals from plants. As quoted from his book, Rare Earths: Forbidden Cures: "Mineral colloids are found in the living systems of bacteria, fungi, green plants (food crops), animals and humans and are coated by a water loving (hydrophilic) substance such as gelatin, albumin, albuminoids, or collagen. This coating protects the now 'organic mineral colloid' and allows it to be a crystalloid for absorption, storage and physiological uses, thus maximizing its bioavailability to 98%."

Proof of the Value of Colloidal Minerals

(28) Proof of colloidal mineral value is demanded by our internet critic, and I've just cited a paragraph from an entire book on the subject (496 pages) written by Dr. Wallach as providing that proof.

Colloidal Minerals Stored in the Human Body

(29) A real difference of opinion exists between the internet critic and Dr. Wallach as regarding the presence of colloidal minerals in the human body. The critic emphasizes that they're only present in the ionic state. In contrast, Dr. Wallach says, "The minerals stored with proteins and lipids are in the colloidal form. The free, ionic minerals found in the human body are in the blood and interstitial tissues, and some minerals formed there are floating colloids as part of cells and interstitial tissues."

Long-lived Cultures Drink Glacial Water

(30) The internet critic's final complaint is that glacial water drunk by long-lived cultures furnishes metallic minerals and not colloidal ones. "That's not my point," Dr. Wallach replies. "The populations noted for longevity get only a very small amount of minerals from drinking glacial milk. Rather, those long-lived societies irrigate with glacial milk to create soil by taking muck out of rivers, agricultural debris and animal manure. They merely irrigate with glacial milk which puts metallic minerals into the soil. The plants absorb these elemental minerals to produce plant-derived colloidal minerals and the people eat those plants.

"This internet critic who is complaining about me is a paid hack for numbers of multivitamin, multi mineral companies who are getting hurt by the colloidal mineral movement," affirms Dr. Wallach. "The companies are paying the person to try and do a hatchet job on me."

Aluminum Present in Colloidal Minerals.

(31) Next we drop to criticisms brought to this book review section by someone who has chosen to ally with Dr. Wallach's internet critic and to remain anonymous as well. Using literature coming from the very multi nutrient manufacturing competitors Dr. Wallach alluded to just above in criticism #30, the Townsend Letter critic questions the presence of aluminum and strontium in colloidal minerals. My interview of Dr. Wallach causes me also to be at odds with him on this point. In our warnings about toxic metals as the source of Alzheimer's disease, my coauthored book, Toxic Metal Syndrome centers its precautionary notes most emphatically on avoiding aluminum.

"In my own book, Rare Earths: Common Cures, I list a lot of common foods containing aluminum: asparagus, beans, Brussels sprouts, celery, cucumbers and much more. There is much more colloidal aluminum in two slices of cucumbers than in a whole bottle of colloidal minerals," Dr. Wallach states. "Aluminum makes up 12% of the Earth's crust and as our planet's most common, it is found in all foods and water. Aluminum has nothing to do with Alzheimer's disease. That's medical 'Ka-Ka' (the stuff left behind in babies' diapers). I don't tell my patients to avoid aluminum deodorants. I want my patients to smell good!"

My impression is that Dr. Wallach is shooting himself in the foot by putting out this opinion which goes against vast numbers of medical references and only gives aid to the aluminum industry of the United States and Canada.

Vitamin E Prevents Alzheimer's Disease in Pigs

(32) Quoting the competitive mineral manufacturer's literature again, the unknown TlfDP reviewer says pigs don't get Alzheimer's disease. "With the pig still alive, how would yo determine if the pig had Alzheimer's disease?" wonders the reviewer. As Dr. Wallach explained in #7 above, pigs do come down with dementia of the Alzheimer's type (DAT).

"In pigs, Alzheimer's disease is called encephalomalacia, a brain syndrome that matches the human form of such dementia. As with elderly humans, a type of DAT does affect pigs," he repeats. "The way one knows the pig has Alzheimer's disease is to do an autopsy, the only verifiable method for the condition, just as in humans."

Again Questioned, Tin Deficiency Causes Baldness

(33) Our TlfDP critical reviewer again uses the competitive manufacturer's printed material to question Dr. Wallach's blaming male pattern baldness on tin deficiency. The veterinarian/naturopath once again cites his references (shown below at footnote number 4 and 5).

Added to this is another statement made in a letter dated February 25, 1997 written to the editor of Self magazine by Dr. Gerhardt N. Schrauzer of San Diego. Informing the magazine, Dr. Schrauzer writes, "As to tin deficiency as a possible cause of baldness, few of Dr. Wallach's critics probably know that his view is backed by animal experiments originally performed by K. Schwarz, et. al. And more recent evidence by K. Yokoi, M. Kimura, and Y. Itokawa of Kyoto University, who found alopecia developing in rats maintained on a low tin diet.

Reduction of Hcl and Digestive Enzymes

(34) The Townsend Letter critic sides with the internet critic as regards Dr. Wallach's claim that there is 3 to 5% absorption of metallic minerals. The two critics say that's "ridiculous." Dr. Wallach replies, "Hypochlorhydrin is a common problem once people hit 35 years of age and that's why betaine hydrochloride sells so well. The reason people younger get it is because they're put on a low-salt diet by ignorant doctors."

Osteoporosis is a Source of Low Back Pain

(35) "We concur with the internet author" who thinks it's absurd to say that osteoporosis is a source of low back pain," affirms the TlfDP critical reviewer.

So who is the Townsend Letter critic agreeing with? What are the internet critic's qualifications?" asks Dr. Wallach.

Vanadium Is Not an Essential Nutrient

(36) This critic representing the TlfDP agrees with the internet critic when he or she says, "...vanadium has not been recognized as an essential nutrient for humans and this is a true statement." Dr. Wallach is firm when he says, "The Townsend Letter is wrong: it's a false statement!" See below for the references footnoted from Dr. Wallach's book, Rare Earths: Forbidden Cures, which indicate vanadium deficiency is associated with he following multiple health problems: (a) slow growth, (b) increased infant mortality, (c) elevated triglycerides, (d) cardiovascular disease, (e) elevated cholesterol, (f) hypoglycemia, (g) hyperinsulinemia, (h) diabetes, (i) infertility, and (j) obesity."

PMS Derives from Calcium Deficiency

(37) The TlfDP unnamed reviewer thinks it's absurd to declare calcium deficiency as the cause of premenstrual syndrome. Dr. Wallach responds with a quote from a University of California news release which said seven years ago: "As much as 85% of the emotional and physical symptoms of PMS derives from calcium deficiency."

Giving You the Rest of the Story"

(38) The TlfD&P critical reviewer, an admirer of Paul Harvey, believes that the internet critic has been 'giving you the rest of the story." Dr. Wallach doesn't accept such sloganeering. "Let's have the internet author identified so that I can show you how little education he has," says the lecturing veterinarian turned naturopath.

In contrast, Dr. Wallach offers his own qualifications, "I have had 75 peer - reviewed articles published in medical and veterinary journals. I've contributed chapters to 8 multi authored textbooks. I've written a textbook of my own, The Diseases of Exotic Animals, containing more than 1000 pages and 2,000 illustrations, published by W.B. Saunders in . It describes over 13,500 of the 17,500 autopsies I've performed on large and small exotic animals," he advises. "I have graduate hours of human and animal pathology, and I gone through a three-year post-doctoral fellowship in comparative pathology."

Now you really do have the rest of the story!

References

1. Casdorph, H.R. & M. Walker, Toxic Metal Syndrome: How Poisonings Can Affect Your Brain (Garden City Park, New York Avery Publishing Group, Inc. 1995) p.4

2. Chinese Journal of Epidemiology 8(3):186-199. 1989

3. Biological Trace Element Research 24:189-205, 1990

4. Katsuhiko, Y., et al. "Effect of dietary tin deficiency on gr and mineral status in rats." Biological Trace Element Research 24:223, 1990. The Hunann Press, Inc.

5. Cardarelli, N.F. Tin as a Vital Nutrient: Implications in Cac Prophylaxis and Other Physiological Processes. (Boca Raton Florida: CRC Press, 1986.

6. Wallach, J.D. & Ma Lan. Rare Earths: Forbidden Cures (Bonita, CA: Double Happiness Publishing Co., 1994) p. 262

7. Schwarz, K. Biochim Biophys. Research Comm. 40:22-29,

8. McNeill, J.H. Biological Effects of Vanadium (Vancouver, British Columbia: The University of British Columbia, June 16, 1990.

9. Nielaan, F.M. "Vanadium." In trace Elements in Human and Animal Nutrition, , 5th edition. W. Mertz, editor, Volume I, II.

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